#club365 – Sara & John – ‘2 stories for the price of 1 – BOOM!’

#club365 – Sara & John – ‘2 stories for the price of 1 – BOOM!’

SARA

On New Year’s Eve 2016, I decided to give up alcohol for a year to raise money for Macmillan Cancer Support.

At the time it seemed like a wild, slightly audacious goal. Whilst I didn’t drink ‘regularly’, there were definitely occasions of binge drinking.

I’d done Dry January for ten years; doing 12 x Dry January’s in a year which included big birthday parties, three international work trips and a boozy company weekend in Marbella would surely be very different!

However, as the saying goes, ‘if it doesn’t challenge you, it doesn’t change you’.

I’d just finished reading Johnny Marr’s autobiography detailing a transformation from a rock and roll lifestyle to a teetotal and vegan one. Whilst I wasn’t ready to become a vegan just yet, the challenge of abstaining for 12 months seemed like a good one. Also, as I see myself as a bit of a rebel, it seemed like the perfect ‘rebellious act’ to choose not to drink for a year!

What I didn’t anticipate was that this ‘challenge’ would actually become a new way of life for me especially when my husband decided to follow suit.

My initial challenge would ultimately transform our lives completely.

Two of the most popular questions I was asked during my ‘dry year’ were,

‘So, what drink will you celebrate with on New Years’ Eve 2017?’ and, ‘Will you ever drink again?’

The truth was that, until November 2017, I actually didn’t know the answer. Initially I’d dreamt of huge decadent cocktails in beautiful glasses and champagne on ice as my reward for my achievement but, as Christmas loomed, I realised I had made my final decision.

I was never going back to drinking.

In a year, I’d learned so much about life, alcohol and myself. It had become clear that drinking was not a reward; in fact, the reward was actually not drinking and all that I had achieved in abstaining.

There have been so many positives during this 19 month journey but there have also been challenges in a society where drinking alcohol is the norm.

Challenges

It can be slightly puzzling for people to learn that you no longer drink. One bemused friend asked ‘But how do you have fun?’ as though he had forgotten what it was like to have fun as a child before drink was ever considered!

I had one fleeting moment of regret when sitting in a lovely restaurant on a boiling hot day and watching everyone around me ordering chilled glasses of rose wine. This lasted seconds before I realised that I was actually thirsty and ordered cold sparkling water instead which was perfect.

Positives

– You’re much more like to succeed if you have a good support network. Go online and surround yourself with people who ‘get it’ and cheer you on. Read about other people’s journeys and their daily struggles to make you feel less alone.

– Before I started my challenge, I read Jason Vale’s ‘How to kick the drink easily’

https://amzn.to/2M8SDav

and it was like a lightbulb moment.

– My husband also becoming alcohol free in May 2017 proved to be incredibly supportive.

– When you don’t drink, going out suddenly gets incredibly cheap. I have been shocked by how much money we have saved as a family simply by both of us cutting out alcohol. I have treated myself to braces on my teeth and hope to have a straight smile for my 50th in 2019!

– The best thing about not drinking for me is definitely no more hangovers. My productivity has gone through the roof and there have been no more wasted weekends feeling sluggish.

– People often talk about using alcohol to ‘take the edge off’ a stressful day, yet coming home and heading back out for a walk has allowed me to become more relaxed than I ever did previously.

– Being sober enables you to live life consciously and experience all of its good and bad parts. When drinking, I was sometimes happy and sometimes unhappy. Now, there are now no ups and downs. Cheesy as it may sound, I am just always happy all of the time!

JOHN

So I guess I kind of fell into sobriety.

My wife Sara had started her journey with a view to completing 12 months alcohol free for charity and I decided to offer some moral support. I would drink quite heavily 2-3 nights a week and seeing how much Sara was enjoying her alcohol free life, I became curious and started to think about not drinking a lot! So in May 2017 I also stopped.

As a business owner, I noticed that after a few months, my decision making was growing in strength and I was becoming much more ambitious and confident. We went as far as to set up a business in San Francisco and hopefully this could be absolutely life changing for us.

I noticed that instead of people becoming judgemental and suspicious of why I was not drinking, they seemed, if anything, to be hugely impressed and maybe even a little envious.

Initially, the test was social events. We offer a lot of work incentives to our salespeople and thus spent several days at the races, at business conferences, and work nights out where we were surrounded by alcohol. But seeing people slowly lose the plot on a night out just strengthened my resolve. I now get my buzz remembering EVERY single conversation, waking up clear headed and looking to attack the day. I’m just so uber positive, it could actually be annoying!

Will I drink again? Genuinely I don’t believe so. The Alcohol Free alternatives in the UK are very good and improving all the time. A cool Alcohol Free beer in a bar after work still does it for me. Being 100% happy, positive and running a fantastic company so outweighs the initial thrill of alcohol which quickly evaporates and eventually just brings you down.

Top tips

– Never look back. You messed up from time to time. So what? You are forgiven and that’s behind you.

– Don’t care what people think. Life is tough and complicated and people have actually got their own stuff to worry about.

– Laugh lots. And surround yourself with other non drinkers. They are fun and also clever enough to have stopped!

Written by Sara & John, edited by Sober Fish

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#club365 – Kate – ‘Take One Minute At A Time’

#club365 – Kate – ‘Take One Minute At A Time’

On 23 July 2018, I celebrated 12 whole years of sobriety. My relationship with alcohol, like most relationships, was complex.

Alcoholism runs in my family and was part of my daily life from the day I was born 54 years ago.

In many ways, it was kind of my destiny; everything was already in place. Genetic predisposition, environmental factors, and psychological tendencies; my progressive descent into alcoholism was marked, like signposts, by significant relationships with men throughout my journey.

The groundwork was laid when I met my first love at 16 years old. It was a wonderful relationship. I couldn’t have created a better match for myself if I’d whipped him up in a laboratory.

We were together, on and off, for 15 years. I always knew we’d met too young; there was no way we were going to settle down and marry right out of high school or college. And, like most teens, we ‘experimented’ with drugs and alcohol.

Smoking weed was a regular activity. Weekends were reserved for parties, football games or lying around in parks with wine coolers.

I took to drinking like a fish to water. I loved it and was very good at it. I weighed around 100 pounds through my teens and twenties, but found I could easily ‘out-drink’ almost any guy I knew, no matter his size. I didn’t learn until much later in life that such a high tolerance is not a good thing.

By my mid-twenties, I was drinking fairly regularly and often to the point of blacking out. I lived a carefree lifestyle, always highly functional, but bailing on things like jobs I became bored with or places I lived.

And ultimately, I bailed on my first love, when I met Casey at age 26.

We were together for just under three years, and in that time, I transitioned from ‘problem drinker’ to ‘alcoholic’. Of course I didn’t see that at the time; this disease sneaks up on you. Nor am I laying blame. But he was my tipping point. When you find someone that you click with on several levels; emotionally, sexually, intellectually, but who also shares your propensity for drinking .. well, it was like hitting the jackpot. My relationship with him validated my relationship with alcohol, and normalized it.

Of course, we had other things in common including a wicked sense of humor, the same tastes in music (except he liked country music, which I couldn’t stand, and still can’t hear to this day without thinking of him), we both loved to dance and we both loved to read. Often, he would read aloud to me; I still miss that. Our ‘singing-in-the-car’ skills were unmatched; sometimes he’d turn off the radio and ask me to sing to him. We both loved dogs, and his big black lab, Blue, was like our child. Our being-in-motion and being-at-rest rhythms were miraculously in sync. Our sex life was magical. Whilst not overly demonstrative with his affections, once in a while he’d make a grand gesture that took my breath away. One time, I got out of the bathtub at his house to hear him yelling my name from outside, and looked out of the window to see that he’d stamped ‘I LOVE YOU KATE’ in 10-foot letters in the snow.

But most of all, we LOVED to drink. We took that shit to the next level. We never talked about it, we just did it. It was like we were two aliens who’d somehow found each other in a foreign land and were able to communicate our growing dependency on alcohol without having to verbalize it.

Previous hard-drinking weekends segued into daily drinking. A boring Tuesday became ‘a special occasion’. We’d meet at a bar after work for a Bloody Mary, then have wine with dinner, then an after-dinner drink followed by a couple of six packs of beer at home. There was always vodka at his house for me and rum for him. On weekends he’d wake me with a Mimosa rather than a coffee. Saturdays and Sundays were spent either socializing with other drinking people at some drinking-centric event, or lying around the house and keeping a steady buzz going all day and night, tangled together on the couch watching old movies. Being with someone who so validated my ‘bad habit’ was a kind of vindication; it assured me that my relationship with alcohol was fine.

When our (inevitable) split came, it was swift, ugly and traumatic. I’ve never really gotten over it. I fully embraced drinking as some kind of pacifier, drifting from one one-night stand to another. When I finally met a kind and decent man with whom I somewhat ‘clicked’, I just went ahead and married him. I mean, that’s what you do, right? It was time, I was in my thirties, all my friends and siblings were married and settled. You buy the house and you marry the guy and you have the kids and then you’re happy.

Except that I wasn’t.

And it wasn’t because he was a bad guy because he’s not. It was because by then, I was literally drowning myself every day. Every decision I made, large and small, was made under the influence of alcohol. I remember him saying to me during an argument about my drinking ‘I hope you’re happy now’ and I shot back ‘Oh my God, you think I’m happy?? I haven’t been happy in years’.

I wasn’t speaking specifically about him or even our marriage, I was speaking in general, and my own words shocked the hell out of me.

When I finally got sober, at the age of 42 with an 18-month-old son, things calmed down a bit, and I had a second child.

The longer I was sober, the more I looked around and realized that I’d make huge life-changing decisions while I was either drunk or hungover. There were so many things in my life that could be called a mistake or a life lesson, including my marriage. We are now amicably divorced and my amazing children are now 11 and 13.

Since my divorce, I’ve been on several dates but am largely focused on my children and my career, which has essentially exploded since I became sober.

Exes have approached me looking for a ‘no-strings’ hookup but one of the best things sobriety has taught me is my own worth. There was a time when I’d sleep with anyone, any time; a guy just wanting me was enough of a reason. I don’t give myself away anymore. I don’t have the time or inclination for the inevitable fallout. And while I’m open to various ages/races/persuasions/careers/levels of baggage, I also know my deal breakers. That doesn’t mean I don’t want physical intimacy, or to find someone to love me and to give my love to, to someone who wants it and is in a position to take it; it means I’m judicious about it.

In a nutshell, I don’t have time for or interest in bullshit.

I’ve had men express interest in me who then abandoned that interest when they discovered that I don’t drink and that’s just fine.

I’m 54 years old, and while I don’t feel old, I’m old enough to know what I want and, more importantly, what I don’t. I’ve been in love several times – real, true, good love; I’ve been married, I’ve had children, and I’ve had fun flings with wonderful men who I remember with great affection. I’m healthy, fairly attractive, funny, sexy, and intelligent. I’d love to think (and am fairly optimistic) that there will be someone to love in my life again, and I’m open to it (although Remy Danton really is a fictional character apparently!)

Until then, I have words to write and children to raise. I am open with them about my sobriety and my experiences as an alcoholic, and they only know me as a sober person. I don’t want to tell them what to do. I want to continue to be a living example of it.

MY TOP TIPS TO ACHIEVE LONG TERM SOBRIETY

1. Addiction can be isolating. I’m not an AA fanatic, but I feel like some kind of support group is crucial, particularly in the first year. When everything has hit the skids or imploded and it’s all so scary and horrible and feels insurmountable and impossible to face, there is no substitute for being literally surrounded by people who know EXACTLY what that feels like, people who have done the same shitty things you have – and worse – and who understand the self-loathing and survived it. It props you up when you can’t prop yourself up.

2. Look around you. I used to wonder how I’d fill my days if I didn’t drink. The universe has a way of filling in the blank spaces in ways you can’t begin to imagine. Let it happen.

3. If you can’t get your head around ‘never’, as in ‘I can never drink again’, and even ‘one day at a time’ seems to hard, try one minute.

One.

Minute.

At.

A.

Time.

Reapply as necessary.

Written by Kate, edited by Sober Fish

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#club365 – Nic – ‘Life begins’

#club365 – Nic – ‘Life begins’

On 13 April 2017, I woke up from my slumber,feeling like I’d chewed on Ghandi’s sandal for the last few hours and desperate for a break from the pounding in my head.

Thankfully, the house was silent and I was very much alone. I sat up, steadied myself, and headed for the bathroom, bleary eyed and feeling like death.

Thankfully, the kids had been taken to school earlier by my mum, who innocently thought I was suffering with a stomach bug. Only that wasn’t quite true.

When she’d arrived to collect the boys, she hadn’t been allowed to venture as far as the kitchen and was therefore blissfully unaware of the two empty bottles of Pinot Grigio hanging out together like old friends in the recycling basket, ready to join their clan in the maroon haven of the recycle bin.

As I looked at my bloodshot eyes in the mirror, I thought ‘Why the bloody hell do I keep on doing this to myself?’. Someone I didn’t recognise stared back at me. ‘Where have you gone Nic?’ I asked with a lump in my throat.

I trudged downstairs and poured myself a glass of water. Ironically, a copy of Women’s Health magazine lay on my doormat. I scooped it up and headed straight back to bed where I half-heartedly began to flick through before pausing on an article about ‘a sober revolution’.

Giving up alcohol had always been on my fitness agenda. It was the missing piece of the transformation, only it had never quite happened.

I’d had many, many attempts at giving up the vino and received many, many eye rolls from family and friends… ‘Oh, OK Nic, you’re back on the wagon again are you? Let’s see how long it lasts this time’.

I felt they were right. I felt like I was a failure. I couldn’t stay off the sauce and I couldn’t stay on the wagon. I craved its ability to take me away from everything that was wrong and for it to catapult any good news into something far more amazing. I craved its ability to knock me out and make me forget.

Although I didn’t quite know how to describe it, the truth was I had a problem with alcohol. I was ashamed of what I was, of the person I’d become, and I didn’t have a clue how to get my sorry ass out of the tiresome cycle of drinking.

Every day, I’d wake up, get up, feel hungover and get through work feeling like death.

I’d get home, have a wine to take the edge off and reward myself for making it through the day. See to the boys, get them in bed, finish off the bottle, then open a second. Fall asleep on the sofa, wake up in the early hours, feel numb and disorientated. Stagger to bed. Wake up, get up and so the cycle began again.

Weekends were much heavier. I’d drink two to three bottles of wine, have a couple of gins, and to top it off, have a good few arguments. I’d do Jack shit to prepare for the week ahead and could feel the stress building inside.

My life was a train wreck heading for disaster.

The magazine article mentioned Club Soda, which is a mindful drinking movement (https://joinclubsoda.co.uk). The web address glared at me from the page. I signed up immediately and can’t explain the relief to discover I wasn’t alone. It turned out that I wasn’t the only one in the world attempting to shield my drinking habits from the people around me. I wasn’t alone in trying to keep my life together whilst wrecking it at the same time.

I cried.

I actually wasn’t alone.

I wanted to stop drinking. I knew I had a problem and at last I had people to turn to; people just like me.

I’m now 15 months sober. I guess you could say that this attempt at staying on the wagon has been successful so far but I can’t say it’s been easy and there certainly isn’t any room for complacency.

On a positive note, the relationship with my boys has improved so much. I am no longer an embarrassment to them but instead, I’m someone they are proud of. I’m slowly beginning to see my potential and learning to love the real me. I’m setting myself challenges, discovering who I am, meeting wonderful, like-minded people and re-discovering things that once gave me pleasure before the veil of alcohol shrouded me.

25 years of alcohol abuse means I have 25 years of catching up to do.

Today, I turn 40. A few weeks ago, I set myself a list of challenges to fulfil. Nothing like the good old bucket list but a list of things that just nudge me out of my comfort zone  (like climbing Mount Snowdon when you have a fear of falling from slopes- I know right?) or things that re-ignite an old skill or passion. Things that make me feel alive and make me laugh and teach me something new.

For years and years my path has been navigated for me, expectations bestowed upon me and now, I want to be in control of myself. Every single morning, I feel like She-ra the Princess Of Power when I get out of bed!

Here are my three top tips if you are just starting out on your journey ..

1) Make yourself accountable

This could be joining a support group or telling a close friend or family member. Personally, I log onto Club Soda Facebook page every day and write a little message. I honestly think this has helped me stay focussed.

2) Plan for the day

I always make a plan for every possibility. This may seem a tad extreme but having things to combat cravings and trigger situations are crucial for me. This could be something like planning an exit strategy from an event you are attending or taking your own alcohol free drinks to a party.

3) Using alcohol free products

I know some can find these a trigger but they have been my lifesaver on so many occasions. I always have a selection in the fridge.

Now that I’m sober, I feel that my life is moving in the right direction. I have good days and bad days but accept that is part of life. It’s how I deal with the emotion that life brings that is different. The 13th of April will always be the beginning of the end of my slippery slope of destruction. It is the day I began to realise I’m worthy and deserve to be happy.

It’s the day I chose me ❤️

Written by Nic, edited by Sober Fish

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#club365 Week – Andrea – @feravida @saspodcast

#club365 Week – Andrea – @feravida @saspodcast

I want to start by saying that my struggle with alcoholism was the greatest gift I have ever received. It was also the single hardest demon I’ve had to defeat.

My experiences of living with alcoholism and my eventual recovery sent me down a path to a wonderful and perfect purpose for my life. If I had the option to erase it from my past, I’d decline, however, at the same time, I wouldn’t wish this struggle on anyone else in the world.

I started drinking as a teenager like many people do and was about 16 when I first got drunk. It wasn’t love at first sight. The heavy drinking started properly when I turned 21 in May 2010, and I was drinking to excess for more days than not.

I was a full-blown alcoholic before I turned 22.

Alcoholism runs in my dad’s side of the family and he struggled with alcoholism for his entire life. I’d heard that a family history of alcoholism could give one a predisposition for addiction, but on a personal level, I didn’t understand how much more likely I was to get addicted.

Nearly everyone around me drank as often as I did, although in smaller amounts. In some ways, alcohol affected my body differently than the other people I was around at the time. I could drink much more than most people I knew, but near the end of my drinking career, I could easily black-out after only 4 beers on a night despite drinking 24 beers in total.

Anyone who has struggled with alcoholism can tell you what it feels like when you wake up each morning. I woke up in absolute terror every single day for years. I was unable to breathe properly, shook uncontrollably and lived in a perpetual state of panic. I was terrified to look at my phone after a night of drinking which was every morning. I was in so much pain but more than anything, I felt completely and utterly alone. I believed that I was experiencing severe anxiety, which I was, but it was only years later that I made the connection that alcohol was making everything worse.

In the summer of 2012, aged 23, I was living in a city several hours from my hometown with no support system in place. I did have three true friends there who did their best to help me, but I wasn’t getting the message that it was my drinking which was causing me to feel the way I felt and to live the way I was living. It was easier to do what I’ve always done and try to handle things on my own than it was for me to ask for help. That is, until it wasn’t.

I had been on the phone to my mom whilst parked in a grocery store car park about a quarter mile from my apartment. We finished the call and almost immediately, I started shaking worse than I ever had before. I had difficulty breathing and was sweating even though I felt like I was going to freeze to death. Somehow, I drove my car home and although I could barely walk, or see, I made it into my dark apartment and collapsed on the couch.

No one was home and I had no mobile service within the apartment to call anyone but still I tried. My phone screen was so bright in the dark living room but I couldn’t hold it still enough to read it because I was shaking so much. I desperately needed water but couldn’t get up to walk ten feet to the sink to get some. I pulled a blanket over myself and stared into the darkness. The shaking intensified into convulsions, and I had what I now know was my first seizure due to alcohol withdrawal. I don’t remember falling asleep.

Over the next two weeks, I had six more seizures before deciding I needed to go to the hospital. I was experiencing convulsions, auditory and visual hallucinations, severe feelings of temperature change, inability to see, and panic. At the time, I thought I was having panic attacks as didn’t know what the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal were plus I’d never heard of delirium tremens (sometimes known as the DT’s).

One of my best friends took me to the emergency room, where they ran lots of tests, injected me with three entire bags of saline to rehydrate me, wrote me a prescription for 10 Ativan (an anti-anxiety drug) but at no point was I asked about my alcohol consumption.

My first shot at sobriety lasted 14 months. I relapsed the night of my dad’s memorial service in May 2014. For the next year and a half, I fought to stay sober and was sober for much more of the time than I was actively drinking. I continued to relapse because I was not willing to face the pain that I had been trying to mask for so long.

Halloween 2015 wasn’t the worst night of my life, but it was the final straw. I finally stopped relapsing on 1 November 2015.

Today, I have been sober for 2 years, 9 months, and 6 days. To be honest, I don’t count anymore and used an online calculator to get that exact figure.

This time was different because I WAS F***ING DONE. I was READY. I saw clearly and understood for real that if I continued drinking, I would lose everything and everyone I loved and then it would kill me. I became a fighter the same day that I surrendered to these facts.

Fast forward to now, and I am a Certified Sober Life Coach, helping people in recovery rebuild their lives or build new ones from scratch once they get clean or sober. I became the person I needed when I first got sober. Like I said at the very beginning of my story, my alcoholism gave me a purpose for my life. My struggle wasn’t for nothing. My mess is my message and I know that I am here to guide those struggling with the same thing I was able to overcome. I am here to support, teach, and coach those who are just a few paces behind me on the journey of recovery and I’m thankful to have lived through what I did to be who I am today doing what I’m doing for others.

In Love and Service,

Andrea Carr

Sober Life Coach

Host of the Sober and Successful podcast

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Written by Andrea, edited by Sober Fish

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#club365 Week – Jo – ‘Coins in a Jar’

#club365 Week – Jo – ‘Coins in a Jar’

On 27 July 2018, I celebrated my first Soberversary; one whole year of being completely alcohol free.

It’s been a year of ups and downs but most importantly, a year of huge self -awareness. Choosing to live a sober life is so many things all at once. I feel strong, but also have incredible moments of weakness and self doubt.

People often ask why I decided to stop.

Well, to get to the nitty gritty, it took a healthcare professional to tell me what I already knew and had repeatedly tried to justify for at least the last 20 years.

Luckily, hearing her words ‘you need to stop drinking and what you are doing is not normal’, was enough to spring me into action.

I started drinking young, at around age 15 and always, ALWAYS, knew that my relationship with alcohol was far from normal. It just got worse and worse until a year ago, after really listening to this doctor’s words, I decided enough was enough.

I decided to try on my own and knew I needed something to make me accountable so started my blog called ‘Coins in a Jar’. I also actually put a coin in a jar every day so that I had something concrete to monitor my progress and I slowly watched the jar fill up.I did lots of research by joining groups, speaking to people, watching videos, reading books and getting my hands on just about any alcohol related content I could find. Reading and relating other people’s triumphs and struggles really helped me hugely.

The hardest part of the year was my mind.

I don’t think I ever physically needed a drink at all. It was the ridiculous tricks that our mind plays that make us think we are missing out. Like any unhealthy relationship that has ended, we always think of the good times. Not the sick times, the regrets, the mess ups, the wasted time.

A year on, I sometimes look at people drinking and think they are lucky. Lucky that they can relax for an hour or two and have that numbness wash over them but then my logical mind kicks in and screams ‘They’re not lucky! You’re the lucky one!’

I also find associations hard which is totally normal. A holiday, a sunset, a get together with friends, good times, bad times, hell! When exactly didn’t we drink alcohol?!😊

I find it quite easy to be around people drinking and when I am offered a drink, I don’t make any excuses. I’m a straight talker and I am honest when explaining how alcohol was simply f…ing up my life. When I verbalise this, I’m usually met with big eyes and a ‘well done’, immediately followed by their own beliefs, justifications or excuses such as ‘they only drink on weekends’.

Honesty is just the only way for me. I believe strongly in openness about mental issues including addiction. My mother was a huge sufferer of addiction, depression, anxiety, you name it. So for us and anyone else suffering with mental issues, I will never play it down. It’s just as important as any other disease that we can see.

If I were to describe my life one year on in one word, it would definitely be ‘quieter’.

Life is also much clearer. I’ve learnt to sit with discomfort and emotions instead of drowning them which takes a lot of practice! I am much fonder of chocolate these days. I’m not a huge stickler for plans as I once was; they don’t really bother me. My best friend is a planner. She will talk about Christmas plans or holidays next year and I laugh and tell her I just can’t think that far ahead.

I used to be a big planner. Had to be busy, see people, have people over. I realise now it was all mainly an excuse to drink. Now I’m in bed at 8 most nights and I love it.

So how did I celebrate my soberversary?

Well, I went out with some friends and had a giant mocktail but more importantly, I had a tattoo done on my arm! Words that I love and I can look at every day. Words that inspire me and remind me to keep going when I do have a down day.

Sobriety is the greatest personal achievement of my life. It’s not just about having the strength to not drink again; it’s made me believe in myself and my abilities. Cliché I know, but I can really now do anything.

I don’t have any intention to drink again, but I guess one can never say never. I don’t want to drink again and I’m almost on the verge of not having to need to drink ever again. Alcohol has become something I just don’t do. Like some people don’t eat sugar, I don’t drink alcohol. I have absolutely no problem being around it.

In fact, I feel a sense of satisfaction when I’m around pissed people.

I smile and think to myself. Thank God it’s not me.

MY 3 TOP TIPS TO HELP YOU LIVE A SOBER LIFE

1. Find something that makes you accountable. This could be joining a support group either online or in person, writing, finding someone with the same sobriety date and spurring each other along.

2. Always remember what you are gaining and not leaving behind.

3. Be kind to yourself and TREAT YOURSEF OFTEN!

Written by Jo, edited by Sober Fish 2018

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